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Curtains Made Easy

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Sewing was my first “hobby”.  I started sewing when I was pregnant with my daughter.  I couldn’t find a bumper pad and crib skirt I liked, so I made them.  Did I know what I was doing?  Not exactly.  But I just went for it.  What’s the worst that could have happened?

Drapes are the one thing that can really add warmth and style to a room.  If you have ever shopped for them, you will know that the patterns and fabric are not great, prices are expensive and most of the time you can only find 84 inch curtains.  (That makes me crazy!  All my window need 96 inch curtains.)  What’s a girl to do?  DIY!!!!!!!

It’s easy.   And fabric shopping is fun.  A great fabric store is the happiest place on Earth, beside Lowes and Home Depot!  The fabric I used in the pictures below was only $5.00 a yard.  It was reduced because of a printing flaw, but you would never find it.  (It was bought at my favorite fabric store, Tony’s Fabrics.)  With that price, it cost $15.00 per panel!  Woohoo! 

All that is required to make drapes or curtains the “Laurie way” is a sewing machine, being able to sew a straight line, (so no drinking while sewing!) a ruler and an iron and ironing board.  I don’t do rules, by the way.  You will probably hear me say that a lot.  That means there are no patterns used.  They are not lined because these curtains are decorative, the fabric is heavy and it’s white on the back side.  If you were going to close the curtains, they would need lining to protect the fabric from the sun.  That’s for another day.

These drapes are for my BFF’s dining room. The fabric is gorgeous! And happy.

 

It’s always good to know which side is up.  That applies to more than just fabric.  Ha!  I didn’t cut the salvage off the edge.  I used it as a guide for the first part of the side hem.  It’s about an inch in case your fabric doesn’t have this type of salvage on the side.   Then iron it.  This is the most important part.  You’ll be ironing more than you will be sewing.

The side hem is folded over again, then ironed.  It’s time-consuming, but it makes the seam flat and easier to sew.  Then sew your straight line close to the edge of the seam.

Do the next side of the fabric the same way.  I attached a safety-pin to the top of the fabric so I would know which end was up.

The top hem is folded over twice, just like the sides.  This time though, turn over the first fold 2 1/2 inches, then fold over again 3 inches.

3 inch hem top hem. 

My sewing machine does not have guides for a 3 inch hem so I measured from the needle where I wanted the stitch to be than used blue tape as my edge guide.

In case I haven’t said it before… Ironing is very IMPORTANT.  But it’s boring.  My daughter caught me with a phone to my ear, multi-tasking.  That’s what mom’s do. ; )

The bottom hem was done the same way as the top hem, except I sat on the floor with the curtains hanging and pinned the seam to the right length.  I ironed them while they were still hanging to make sure they were exactly the length I wanted.  Then I took them off the rod and sewed the bottom seam.

Here’s another example of easy to make curtains.  These curtains are in my house. These were super easy to make. I bought a set of white curtains from Ikeas and added “designer” fabric to the top. 

 

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5 responses »

  1. oh that’s a great idea! I made all the curtains for the bedrooms but never considered the big ones in the living spaces- that I’ve been wanting to replace but never find anything I *love*!! Just another reason I’m so glad to have found you and your blog!

    Reply
  2. Love the Hair! plus….the curtains you made..you make it look so simple.

    Reply
  3. Pingback: Gazebo Curtains – No Sewing | Farm Boy City Girl

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